Student alumni

We are always pleased to hear from former transit lab members! Please fill out the MIT Transit Lab Alumni Form if you would like to add or edit your information.

 

Michel Babany

Michel's research interests focus on developing a Decision Support System in order to mitigate the impacts of incidents in the London Underground. He earned a Bachelor's Degree in Engineering in September 2012 at the Ecole Centrale Paris. In 2013, he was a recipient of the Speedwell Fellowship and the Jean Gaillard Scholarship, and in 2015 in earned a Master of Science in Transportation at MIT.

Raphael Dumas

Raphael attended McGill University, where he received a B. Eng. in Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics. Passionate about solving global environmental problems he concentrated in transportation in his final year, on the basis of the links between transportation, and land and energy use. Raphael received a Alexander Graham Bell Canada Graduate Scholarship to pursue the Master of Science in Transportation at MIT in 2012. His research focuses on processing automatically collected data to generate origins and destinations for an entire population of transit users. He earned a dual program MST/MCP (Master of Science in Transportation and a Master of City Planning) in 2015.

Emily Gates

Emily Gates graduated in 2015 with a Master of Science in Transportation. While at MIT she worked on employer commuter benefit programs and reducing single-occupancy vehicle commuters, as well as real-time ridesharing mobile applications for commuting. She was previously working as an IT business analyst outside of Washington, D.C. and cursing the heavily congested highways of northern Virginia. She has a strong interest in the connections between transportation accessibility and urban economic growth. She loves attending public works meetings and hearing the public's opinions on transportation initiatives. Emily has a B.S. in Industrial Engineering from Northwestern University.

Michael Gordon

Mike graduated with a Master of Science in Transportation in 2015. Having grown up in Boston and lived on three of the MBTA’s Green Line branches, his research focused on understanding how public-private partnerships and contracting can help transit systems to grow while facing various constraints. Before joining the program, Mike received his bachelor’s degree in Economics at Boston College and worked at an economic consulting company.

Anne Halvorsen

Anne graduated from the University of California, Berkeley in 2013 with a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering. Her past research has included studying transit system reliability in both San Francisco and Hong Kong, trying to understand how users adapt their behavior to cope with unreliability and helping develop more customer-centric reliability metrics for agencies. While at MIT she worked with Hong Kong's MTR system to evaluate demand management incentives and better understand customer behavior in the system. She graduated with a Master of Science in Transportation in 2015.

Matthew Hartnett

Matthew graduated with a Master of Science in Transportation in 2016. During his time at MIT, Matthew studied transportation demand management strategies and worked on a project team of Transit Lab research associates and students to deliver an improved transportation demand management program, called Access MIT, which was adopted by the Institute for implementation in summer 2016.  Before attending MIT, he studied at the University of Delaware, earning a bachelor’s in civil engineering in 2014. Matthew currently works as a municipal transportation planner in Park City, Utah, focusing on developing and evaluating the City’s strategies to effectively manage transportation demand while strengthening Park City’s status as a world-class skiing destination.

Gabriel Goulet-Langlois

Gabriel's research interests relate to travel pattern and user behaviour analysis in urban transit networks. Using large smartcard datasets, he develops methods to understand and quantify regularity in users’ travel routines, and working to identify and investigate different types of public transport users. Gabriel earned his bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering and Applied Sciences from McGill University, where he was also the recipient of the British Science Association Medal. He earned his Master of Science in Transportation from MIT in 2015. His all-time favorite transit line is the Victoria line in London.

Yan Leng

Yan received her Master degrees in Transportation Engineering and Computer Science in June 2016. She worked on the mobility project in Jinan for a year and a half at Transit Lab. Since then, she has been working on the Andorra.  She is currently a research specialist at Human Dynamics Laboratory in MIT Media Lab, doing research on the Andorra Project. The broad theme of her research interest is to use large-scale dynamic datasets to describe, understand, and explain regular patterns in individual and aggregative behavior and to leverage these patterns for policy analysis and design with machine learning and statistical tools. 

Kathleen McLaughlin

Katie graduated with a Master of Science in Transportation in 2016. Before coming to MIT, she graduated from the University of California, Berkeley with a bachelor’s degree in civil and environmental engineering and then spent a year doing research with a local bus system in Columbus, Ohio. Her research at MIT involved identifying and predicting modal shifts between auto and transit caused by improvements to the system under capacity constrained conditions. She was also interested in the wider economic benefits these improvements could generate due to the increase in throughput capacity and enhanced development potential. She now works in transportation consulting in Chicago.

Javier Morales Sarriera

Javier was a research assistant at MIT Transit Lab between 2014 and 2016, when he conducted research on transit agency productivity and cost. His research revealed that the soaring unit costs of transit service can be explained in large by the sector's stagnant productivity, and that contracting out and labor laws can also have a significant association with unit cost growth. Overall, Javier is interested in all applications of economics in public transit, and in transportation more broadly. Javier graduated in 2016 with a Master's degree in Transportation from MIT, and he also received a Master’s degree in Economics and Finance from Centro de Estudios Monetarios y Financieros (Madrid, Spain). 

Chris Southwick

Chris graduated with a Master of Science in Transportation in the spring of 2016. During his time at MIT his research focused on using automatically collected data to help transit agencies identify bus routes and time periods with significant amounts of overcrowding; and to identify possible remedies to improve the passenger experience during these periods. He grew up in Califon, New Jersey, an exurb outside of New York City and graduated from Haverford College in 2011 with a bachelor's degree in mathematical economics and a minor in growth and structure of cities. He then spent three years serving with various AmeriCorps programs through out the country. Chris loves reading local newspapers and learning about the community in which he lives.

Lauren Tarte

Lauren's primary research interests are in the design, planning and policy of urban transportation systems -- working on characterizing the demand and service patterns on the London Underground and quantifying passenger impacts. Lauren holds a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from the University of Washington, and previously interned at the Seattle Department of Transportation. After graduating, she spent two and a half years as a Maintenance Engineer at Boeing. In 2015 she graduated from MIT with a Master of Science in Transportation.

Catherine Vanderwaart

Katie graduated with a Master of Science in Transportation in 2016. Before coming to MIT, she graduated from the University of California, Berkeley with a bachelor’s degree in civil and environmental engineering and then spent a year doing research with a local bus system in Columbus, Ohio. Her research at MIT involved identifying and predicting modal shifts between auto and transit caused by improvements to the system under capacity constrained conditions. She was also interested in the wider economic benefits these improvements could generate due to the increase in throughput capacity and enhanced development potential. She now works in transportation consulting in Chicago.

Dan Wood

Dan attended the University of Pennsylvania, where he graduated in 2013 with a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering. He earned a Master of Science in Transportation from MIT in 2015. In the past, he has interned for the King County Metro, where helped implement the RapidRide C and D Lines, and for STV Incorporated, where he did operations planning for the proposed Glassboro-Camden Line near Philadelphia.